Any old guys have hip replacements?

Discussion in 'Men's Health Forum' started by nukklehead, Jul 25, 2019.

  1. nukklehead

    nukklehead Member

    50 y/o amateur p-lifter/bench only guy for last 15 years. Used to lift full until pain got so bad about 12-13 years ago, obviously its time to pay the piper. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Rumors say if you are in shape etc you bounce back pretty quick. Don't plan on ever squatting/DL more then 225 for a few reps to stay in shape if I can even get back to that level. Have been doing a lot of core, glute work as recommended by P.T. Will try to get back to gym ASAP even if walking on cane for a bit. Surgery date 9/10/19.
    Cycle history: Blast 1-2 mild/mod cycles yearly for competition for 15 years never exceeding 1g of gear/wk. (less is more approach) and cruise on 200mg/wk +hcg.
    Looking at loading up on tb-500 prior to surgery and busting balls in therapy post op.
    to try and come back as soon as possible.
    MD says most likely "somewhat" genetic degeneration not necessarily powerlifting related. Played a lot of baseball in younger years as a catcher. Sure that didn't help either on my haunches for 9 innings a day. Right hip doesn't bother but films show its on its way too MD said. Tried all kinds of restorative work (you name it) before succumbing to the knife but I think its time. LMK if you know older lifters who have been through this and suggestions they may have to accelerate/improve outcome.
    Thanks
    Nukklehead
     
    Big Swole Papa Smurf likes this.
  2. johntt44

    johntt44 Member

    I had a knee replacement at 47yo. It was a breeze! I've had 3 big pins in my right hip since I was 12yo but it never bothers me. My mom had a hip replacement last year at 70 though.I dont know how well a knee replacement correlates to a hip replacement but the pain will be gone at least.
     
  3. mp46

    mp46 Member

    Knew somebody that had their femur snap off inside the hip. They had to remove the ball of the femur and then replace the hip. He was walking by the end of the day and racing motorcycles competitively in a few months. Watch a hip replacement surgery on youtube if you can stomach it, they torque and flex the shit out of those joints on the operating table. I don't know about weight limits but no one I've know with knee or hip replacements was limited athletically
     
  4. greenddog1

    greenddog1 Member

    I had the Birmingham method of hip replacement in 2009 it has been the only part of my body that doesn't hurt. I run, lift, play all sports without any problems or concerns. I strongly urge you explore this method if you want to stay active. The other methods where they cut off the head of the femur and replace it with a prosthesis ( metal rod with a ball on the end) will certainly limit the range of your activities. Good luck to you.
     
    IronJulius likes this.
  5. JP1979

    JP1979 Member

    I had mine fixed 4 years ago. Some osteoplasty, reattached labrum and it was brutal. I wish they would have done the partial replacement and just got it over with. They said they are gonna have to yank it eventually anyway.
     
  6. nukklehead

    nukklehead Member

    From what I here the knees are worse pain then the hips surprisingly. Glad you did as well as you did. Hope I am as tough as you were.
    I hear that surgery is even worse to recover from then a total replacement..my labrum is jacked and pretty much gone. Wish you we ll when it comes time to replace JP.

    Thanks for replies to all. FWIW my MD uses an anterior approach on the front of the hip for access which is suppose to be better then the lateral approach. No one around here does Birmingham. Looks interesting though if you are younger. Supposedly new implants last 20-30 years. I don't buy that. Im figuring on 15 for one and 15 for another. Don't think I will want to be around much past 70 if I make it there. If I do the 2nd one, it wont get as much wear and tear as the first.
     
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  7. johntt44

    johntt44 Member

    50 is relatively young so you should heal up and recover just as well. I barely remember the knee replacement/recovery, it breezed by. You'll do great. It's nice not having to take meds or NSAIDs for pain. Before you know it you'll be walking around pain free.
     
    nukklehead likes this.
  8. greenddog1

    greenddog1 Member

    Lol I was 60 when I had the surgery and you need to rethink the "not wanting to be around much past 70 thought" . Hell, 70 is the new 40. I haven't slowed down yet and leave most of my much younger friends back at the starting gate when it comes to energy and activities.
     
  9. JP1979

    JP1979 Member

    That whole one size fits all metal thing really is stupid. Not everyones hip has the same angle. They should Birmingham everyone that can get it and if it breaks then do the full replacement.
     
    greenddog1 likes this.
  10. JP1979

    JP1979 Member

    It was the absolute worst thing I've ever dealt with in my life. 2 years to get my leg back to normal. Pain free but fuck man, I went to 4 stints of PT before they finally broke up the scar tissue so I could get full range of motion back.
     
  11. nukklehead

    nukklehead Member

    Yeah I kind of agree with you the more I read about it. Maybe someday it will become the standard. Nearest Doc to me is Chicago and that is quite a bit away. Not too mention if I have post op complications my primary MD is not in the area and I have to rely on a whole new set of Doctors that don't know me to pull me out of a mess god forbid if that were to happen, and lets not even talk about the insurance complications. They wont cover shit out of network.

    Docs said I was too far gone for the resurfacing. Sounds like that is a blessing. I know a woman I work with and like you it took her 3 years. to bounce back. Hind sight is 20/20 right?.. Im not saying I wont make it that far (past 75 ish) but genetics are not in my favor for longevity. My family has always lived "healthy" lifestyles but severe vascular disease/cancer/CAD run rampant and no matter how much we (genetic family) live the appropriate "healthy" lifestyle, we all seem to succumb to one of the above disease processes in our late 60's. Who knows though as medicine advances right?

    Thanks for your input.