Contest Prep - How to

Discussion in 'Bodybuilding Forum' started by jaymaximus, Jan 14, 2018.

  1. jaymaximus

    jaymaximus Member

    Im the Powerlifting forum there is a thread about how to get ready for a meet from signing up to selecting openers. I would like to see the same thing here from the people that have experienced it. Seems like the perfect thread for the first bodybuilding forum sticky.
     
  2. Skull

    Skull Member AnabolicLab.com Supporter

    Subbed. You have the right idea with this one @jaymaximus ..... I could see this thread easily becoming a stickie......
     
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  3. Wunderpus

    Wunderpus Member AnabolicLab.com Supporter

    I've only done "mock" preps since I've never stepped on stage... So, I don't really feel qualified to answer too much about this... @fodsod @ruckin
     
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  4. fodsod

    fodsod Member

    Writing up an A-Z “how to” on a bodybuilding/classic/physique show prep would be a pretty long post if done correctly.

    There are so many variables that can be different for prep based on current condition, experience, level of competition, expectations of the competitor (one time thing, just for fun, want to be Mr. Olympia), age, time constraints and budget.

    It’s a good idea if someone wants to take it on feel free to PM me and I’ll help contribute ideas on subject matter, organization or whatever is needed. Some things vary from show to show depending on the organization, the level of the show and promoters.

    I start the first phase of my 2018 show prep in a week so I don’t have the time to write it myself but I’d be glad to help out before my brain goes into a useless, carb depleted jelly sack taking up space in my skull. :)
     
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  5. jaymaximus

    jaymaximus Member

    I wouldn't expect one person to, just anyone chiming in who has knowledge. Kind of get ideas and thought's from everyone.

    But a straight forward question to begin, how to pick a contest?
     
  6. fodsod

    fodsod Member

    Picking a show to do isn’t a difficult thing but it does require some forward thinking. On average, if someone has never done a show its best to give prep about 12-16 weeks to allow for a gradual process, to work on posing (it takes time to get good at it and put together a routine with music) and order your posing trunks and so on.

    So with that time frame in mind (12-16 weeks) you’ll need to decide if you want to compete in a smaller show that isn’t sanctioned or just go ahead and jump into the NPC.

    Shows are expensive and time consuming so I’d recommend a sanctioned NPC show to get your money’s worth in quality of judging, the actual running of the show (stays on time) and awards. Unless you know of a really well done unsanctioned local show. They are out there but few and far between.

    Nothing is worse than showing up for a contest after 12 weeks of prep to find out you are the only person in your weight class and there are only 5 guys total in your category. It’s happens and it’s irritating to work that hard and beat no one. I’ve seen it first hand while helping friends get ready for their first shows. Not cool.

    Finding NPC shows to compete in isn’t too hard. You can contact your State’s NPC chairman (they usually have a website that lists all the upcoming shows for that State) or the NPC National website will have a list of the bigger shows across several states.

    You don’t have to stay in your state to compete. Almost all shows have no restrictions on who can enter. The only ones that do have a resident only restriction are typically the actual State championship (NPC Florida state championship or similar).

    The NPC requires a yearly membership cost. I think it’s like $125 now. That’s just for the competitor to be allowed to compete in NPC sanctioned events. It’s a once a year cost but it is required. You can join early if you want through the NPC website or most shows will allow you to register the morning of the show. You need to check this though because some do not and you’ll need to have your card when you show up for prejudging. You can contact the shows promoter for that info if it’s not listed on the show promotion posters or on the event website. There will also be the cost of entering the show itself. It ranges from $50-$500 depending on the show.

    Finally, once you have an idea of which show you have the time frame to get ready for you’ll need to start making a list of all the gear and supplies you’ll need for the entire prep. Do not think for one moment that you’ll just be able to get some thing down the road. I promise you it’ll be unavailable when you need it.

    Spend the money up front and get all your shit ahead of time. Everything, GH, injectable AAS, orals, thyroid, clen/albuterol and anything else that you need or want to use.

    That’s about as basic of an answer as I can give on picking a show. I’m sure I’ve forgotten a few things or maybe others have some stuff to add also that I missed or is relevant to their state or something they experienced themselves when deciding which show to do.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2018
  7. jaymaximus

    jaymaximus Member

    Excellent
     
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  8. biglumber69

    biglumber69 Member AnabolicLab.com Supporter

    What is the best thing my kid could read for how to post on stage. He has not started lifting yet because he just turned 11. He does do a ton of body weight exercises and lots of baseball and basketball. He is obsessed with bodybuilding. I have no clue about bodybuilding because I was always a power lifter.
     
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  9. fodsod

    fodsod Member

    Here's some good basic information on all the mandatory posing done in a bodybuilding show. The article has a bunch of links to give greater details for each pose also. That should be plenty of information for your son.

    Posing Guides - Profile Page


    If he's more of a video kind of kid here's a good video that covers the basics also:

     
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  10. biglumber69

    biglumber69 Member AnabolicLab.com Supporter

    @fodsod thanks he will love it
     
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  11. jaymaximus

    jaymaximus Member

    Another Question, Coaches, do you NEED them to be successful and how to pick one that doesn't just want to see my noodz?
     
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  12. jaymaximus

    jaymaximus Member

    Need opinions. For a first timer would it be better to pick a contest far out, get coaching, etc. or do a contest for experience before that?
     
  13. fodsod

    fodsod Member

    The coach question is a tough one.

    Coaches can be expensive and may or may not actually know their stuff. Show prep is already expensive so the added cost may not be affordable to many competitors.

    It also depends on the help you need. If you can’t or don’t want to figure out your prep diet/cardio/training/PED/ posing/posing routine set up then a coach is the way to go. A good coach will cover all of those areas for you and all you need to do is follow direction.

    The other thing a coach is good for is the last week or two leading up to the show. The final week is especially important and a good coach will have a plan to help dial you in over that last week to ensure you look your best.

    Having said all that, a coach is 100% not necessary especially at the lower levels of competition. All of the show prep info needed can be found on the internet and if you’re a good year round bodybuilder then you’ll already know your daily macros and can build a contest PED cycle without a coach.

    Bottom line, if you can afford one, intend on doing more shows and he’s good then it’s a chance to learn some new stuff and probably and he’ll know your body better each time so you can look better.

    On the other questions I’d say anyone that wants to do a show needs to go see one. Go to pre judging and spend sometime hanging around the pump up area and back stage if you can get back there. You need to actually see what goes on and see how it works.

    It’s not really necessary to actually do a show for experience but it can’t hurt. Again, it comes back to how comfortable are you with your own decisions and assessment ability regarding getting in shape, posing and dialing in the last few days.
     
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  14. fodsod

    fodsod Member

    The coach question is a tough one.

    Coaches can be expensive and may or may not actually know their stuff. Show prep is already expensive so the added cost may not be affordable to many competitors.

    It also depends on the help you need. If you can’t or don’t want to figure out your prep diet/cardio/training/PED/posing/posing routine set up then a coach is the way to go. A good coach will cover all of those areas for you and all you need to do is follow direction.

    The other thing a coach is good for is the last week or two leading up to the show. The final week is especially important and a good coach will have a plan to help dial you in over that last week to ensure you look your best.

    Having said all that, a coach is 100% not necessary especially at the lower levels of competition. All of the show prep info needed can be found on the internet and if you’re a good year round bodybuilder then you’ll already know your daily macros and can build a contest PED cycle without a coach.

    Bottom line, if you can afford one and he’s good then it’s a chance to learn some new stuff.

    On the other questions I’d say anyone that wants to do a show needs to go see one. Go to pre judging and spend sometime hanging around the pump up area and back stage if you can get back there. You need to actually see what goes on and see how it works.
     
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  15. LordSamuilo

    LordSamuilo Member

    This is honestly where i think having a coach is important , and a very good point . Those last couple weeks when your brain is working against you , and telling you to start changing up your plan because " you're not ready" blah blah .. it can be a very valuable tool having an experienced eye to keep you from going off the rails and sabotaging your entire prep in the end stretch. I know i personally I dont have the best decision making skills when im peeled and depleted lol , but if you can keep a level head and not get manic more power to ya .
     
  16. fodsod

    fodsod Member

    Could not agree more. Most of us have spent WAY too much time looking in the mirror, not liking what we see and thinking we need to change something quick. A coach you trust will keep you grounded and on track.

    Not to mention that stress and worrying will cause hormones you don’t want an excess of to be present. Those hormones can drastically change your look or keep your body from doing what it normally does. Having a solid plan that you have confidence in or a coach makes a big difference.
     
  17. jaymaximus

    jaymaximus Member

    More questions:

    What is a normal price for coaching?

    How do you decide what categories to enter? Novice - age - open - so on
     
  18. LordSamuilo

    LordSamuilo Member

    Thats kinda depends , but a GOOD local coach in my neck of the woods will set you back 1500-3500$ for a 12 week prep . But say its a national qualifier , that usually carriers over to a second show if you were to qualify for a national show (with most coaches ) .
     
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  19. fodsod

    fodsod Member

    The sky is the limit on coaching. There is no standard pricing I'm aware of, not even close.

    Coaching costs will be determined by how popular/well known he/she is, the amount of clients they have at the time and the big one is what all the coach is providing (training in person, training online, nutrition daily, nutrition weekly or just a pre-formed program, PEDs usage protocol or if it'll be adjusted along the way, access for questions, peak week adjustments based on real time (hourly pics) or once/twice a day "how are you looking" texts. You get the point. The more they provide the more it'll cost.

    Deciding the category is based on how you feel about your chances and previous experience. A really good teen may do OK in the novice or junior but probably not the open. An older guy may do well in the open if he's good but if he's so so then Masters 35+ is the way to go so he's got a better shot at winning.

    Novice is for true first timers and typically is just that. Junior class is for guy not ready for the open yet. Typically there's not a lot of difference at the lower levels but at the State level and up (especially National level) there can be a big variance in development between the junior and open class.

    A lot of competitors will enter 2 or 3 different categories to maximize their efforts. A guy in classic physique may also be good in physique. Some guys are good classic physique and cross over into bodybuilding.

    I have no clue on any of the other categories. Women, physique or classic physique are not my thing so someone else will need to chime in.