Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

Discussion in 'Security, Privacy & Anonymity' started by cvictorg, Jun 9, 2013.

  1. cvictorg

    cvictorg Member

    Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations | World news | guardian.co.uk

    NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden: 'I don't want to live in a society that does these sort of things' – video | World news | guardian.co.uk

    NSA | World news | The Guardian

    Name Of NSA Leaker Edward Snowden Interview VIDEO Greenwald | Mediaite

    Snowden handed over a bulk of highly classified material from the secretive organization to Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, who describes the initial set of materials:

    In a note accompanying the first set of documents he provided, he wrote: “I understand that I will be made to suffer for my actions,” but “I will be satisfied if the federation of secret law, unequal pardon and irresistible executive powers that rule the world that I love are revealed even for an instant.”

    [...] Despite these fears, he remained hopeful his outing will not divert attention from the substance of his disclosures. “I really want the focus to be on these documents and the debate which I hope this will trigger among citizens around the globe about what kind of world we want to live in.” He added: “My sole motive is to inform the public as to that which is done in their name and that which is done against them.”

    After copying the last amount of information, Snowden asked for some time off, and disappeared from his domestic life in Hawaii rather mysteriously. He has since been hiding out in a hotel room in Hong Kong.

    Snowden is well aware that the United States government will almost certainly arrest and prosecute him:

    He predicts the government will launch an investigation and “say I have broken the Espionage Act and helped our enemies, but that can be used against anyone who points out how massive and invasive the system has become”.

    The only time he became emotional during the many hours of interviews was when he pondered the impact his choices would have on his family, many of whom work for the US government. “The only thing I fear is the harmful effects on my family, who I won’t be able to help any more. That’s what keeps me up at night,” he said, his eyes welling up with tears.
     
    Millard Baker likes this.
  2. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

    During the last part of the twentieth century the United States began developing a new form of governance that features the collection, collation, and analysis of information about populations both in the United States and around the world. This new form of governance is the National Surveillance State.

    In the National Surveillance State, the government uses surveillance, data collection, collation and analysis to identify problems, to head off potential threats, to govern populations, and to deliver valuable social services. The National Surveillance State is a special case of the Information State - a state that tries to identify and solve problems of governance through the collection, collation, analysis and production of information.

    The War on Terror may be the most familiar justification for the rise of the National Surveillance State, but it is hardly the sole or even the most important cause. Increasing use of surveillance and data mining by public and private entities is a predictable result of accelerating developments in information technology. In fact, most surveillance in the National Surveillance State is likely to be in private hands.

    The question is not whether we will have a surveillance state in the years to come, but what sort of state we will have. The National Surveillance State poses three major dangers for our freedom. The first danger is that government will create a parallel track of preventative law enforcement that routes around the traditional guarantees of the Bill of Rights. The second danger is that traditional law enforcement and social services will increasingly resemble the parallel track. Once governments have access to powerful surveillance and data mining technologies, there will be enormous political pressure to use them in everyday law enforcement and for delivery of government services. Private power and public-private cooperation pose a third danger. Because the Constitution does not reach private parties, government has increasing incentives to rely on private enterprise to collect and generate information for it, thus circumventing constitutional guarantees. Corporate business models, in turn, lead companies to amass and analyze more and more information about individuals in order to target new customers and reject undesirable ones.

    The Administrative and Welfare State raised problems not only for the Constitution, but also for the rule of law itself. The same is true for the National Surveillance State. Changing methods of government demand new strategies to preserve constitutional values and democratic self-government. We mastered at least some of the problems caused by the rise of the Administrative and Welfare state; we must hope that we can do so the same for the National Surveillance State, which is already here.

    Balkin, Jack M., The Constitution in the National Surveillance State. Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 93, No. 1, 2008; Yale Law School, Public Law Working Paper No. 168. Available at SSRN: The Constitution in the National Surveillance State by Jack M. Balkin :: SSRN
     
    Millard Baker and pumpingiron22 like this.
  3. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

    Metadata is often more revealing than contents of a communication, which is what's being collected with PRISM. This study found that as few as four "spatio-temporal points," such as the location and time a phone call was placed, is enough to determine the identity of the caller 95 percent of the time.

    Unique In The Crowd: The Privacy Bounds Of Human Mobility
    Unique in the Crowd: The privacy bounds of human mobility : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group


    We study fifteen months of human mobility data for one and a half million individuals and find that human mobility traces are highly unique. In fact, in a dataset where the location of an individual is specified hourly, and with a spatial resolution equal to that given by the carrier's antennas, four spatio-temporal points are enough to uniquely identify 95% of the individuals. We coarsen the data spatially and temporally to find a formula for the uniqueness of human mobility traces given their resolution and the available outside information. This formula shows that the uniqueness of mobility traces decays approximately as the 1/10 power of their resolution. Hence, even coarse datasets provide little anonymity. These findings represent fundamental constraints to an individual's privacy and have important implications for the design of frameworks and institutions dedicated to protect the privacy of individuals.
     
    Millard Baker likes this.
  4. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UrOZllbNarw]Why Shouldn't I Work for the NSA? (Good Will Hunting) - YouTube[/ame]
     
  5. novicebb

    novicebb Member