Free Testosterone Range, Aged Based?

Discussion in 'Men's Health Forum' started by jinxie1, Dec 10, 2007.

  1. #1
    jinxie1

    jinxie1 Junior Member

    I believe most of us are of the opinion that the "normal" ranges for lab tests are a far cry from optimal. Indeed, a large portion of the so-called normal ranges are often unhealthy, and sometimes much worse.

    An example of the idiocy behind these ranges is free testosterone. According to Quest, normal T range is 250-1100. As we know, Quest, like most of the labs, failure to break the range down by age, which is absurd. Thus, my total T of 350 & 373 (approximately the 14th% of the range) are labeled normal, even though I'm 37 years old. Making matters worse is the range for % free testosterone, which is 1.5 - 2.2. Mine happens to be 1,22, outside the range. But Quest multiplies the % free testosterone by the total testosterone to get the normal free testosterone range (35-155). Thus, anything beyond .155 times 250 is deemed normal. As a result, my total free T of 45.3 ( approximately the 8th% of the range) is deemed within the normal range. How and the hell can that be??? It's considered normal to be a the bottom of the barrel of both ranges??? The mid point of total T times % free T is 125 -- I'm 1/3rd of that and I am considered within the "normal" range? And the guy who has the top of both ranges, with 5 times as much free T as me, is also in the "normal" range?!?!?! This flips the concept of "normal" on its head, even if you leave aside the fact that the ranges should be aged based. Certainly, there should be an adjustment when you are multiplying two variables. Otherwise you end up with low normal times low normai, which is REALLY JUST LOW, under any reasonable evaluation. Mathematically, this makes no sense to me. IF WE WERE RACE HORSES, WITH PATHETICALLY LOW NUMBERS LIKE MINE, WOULD THE VET CALL US "NORMAL"??? Me thinks not. But, alas, we are not race horses, we're just humans, expected to accept our "normal" pathetic plight. HORSE SHIT, I say!

    I imagine that some of the home collection kits provide much more appropriate aged based ranges. Might anyone have those ranges in a readable form? I dont have Excel on my home computer, so I am unadle to open the file that is posted on these boards. But mostly, I'm just airing my frustrations. This sort of thing needs to be better regulated so that the clueless doctors can know when it is appropriate to send a patient to a specialist who has a clue. Fortunately, if you are here, you figured it out yourself. Kudos to you. I'd like to help those that suffer for faults in the system, such as this one.

    Thanks in advance for the ranges, should you post them.
    ~j
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2007
  2. #2
    pmgamer18

    pmgamer18 Junior Member

    I hear ya bottom line is to get past your Dr. to many are fast to read labs and look for one to be in the normal range your TT labs are normal but for a man over 100 yrs. old.
    Center For Clinical Age Management - Natural Hormone Replacement, Boca Raton Florida.
    The above link has ranges by age.

    Dr.'s forgot there math and need to read this link over and over again.
    IQ Test Labs - free online testing.

    Plus most of the samples that get to come up with the ranges are from sick people.

    In this link it states to keep your Total and Free testosterone levels up into the upper 1/3 of your labs range for a young man. And to keep your Estradiol down between 10 to 30 best at 20 pg/ml.

    I follow this and it works.
     
  3. #3
    sailing man

    sailing man Junior Member

    I was looking for data on the ranges when doing TRT. The general information I found said total T should be based on the levels of a 29 year old man. I just got my test back after six weeks on T CYP, and had 400 total and 14 free T. Way too low. I have a goal of 700 to 800 total, and at least 20 free, which relates to higher levels when I go back next week.
     
  4. #4
    Kwirion

    Kwirion Member

  5. #5
    JamieJAbshire

    JamieJAbshire Junior Member

    The link above says for a 30 year old man Free T is 12.3 is this right?

    My husband has all the symptoms for low t but his Total T is 624 LR 280-800 and Free T 3.5 LR 2.0-4.4

    These were done in may and his symptoms have gradually worsened and now we have no insurance.

    I know with my thyroid issues lab ranges are pretty meaningless so I am wondering if the same is true for T ranges?
     
  6. #6
    stumpy40

    stumpy40 Member


    Yes they are....

    Can I ask what symptoms he is having? Has he had any other labs done? There are a bunch that need to be drawn before considering TRT. TT and Free T while important are just a smidgen of what needs to be known.
     
  7. #7
    JamieJAbshire

    JamieJAbshire Junior Member

    Major constant irritibliity, abdomen weigh, back pain, insomnia, receeding hair line, he says his bones hurt, lack of libido, lack of interest in pretty much anything other then hunting. he says he is just angry all the time and doesn't know why.

    He had thyroid testing done also but they won't admit it is a problem and neither will he but his t3 uptake was L 32.0 LR 33.0-40.0 FT4 0.56 L and TSH 1.38

    And I screwed up his free T is 11.4 LR 8.7-25.1
    The 3.5 was FT3 LR 2.0-4.4

    Cortisol AM 19.6 H LR 6.2-4.4

    And his thyroid tests are worse then they were the time before which was about a year.

    high ALT 93 LR 30-65

    Seemingly good cholesterol, neg ANA, checked for lymes disease neg, and neg RA
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2010
  8. #8
    JamieJAbshire

    JamieJAbshire Junior Member

    Free T also says direct if that makes a dif
     
  9. #9
    Kwirion

    Kwirion Member

    High cortisol => irritibliity. [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cortisol"]Cortisol - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia@@AMEPARAM@@/wiki/File:Cortisol2.svg" class="image"><img alt="" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/Cortisol2.svg/225px-Cortisol2.svg.png"@@AMEPARAM@@commons/thumb/0/0d/Cortisol2.svg/225px-Cortisol2.svg.png[/ame]

    He need full check of adrenal glands etc.

    High cortisol can be caused by elevated estradiol or elevated prolactin too.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2010
  10. #10
    DragonRider

    DragonRider Junior Member

    His test levels look good. Has he tested his estradiol? He can test it privately at Private MD - Buy Lab Tests Online.
    Is he overweight, especially around the abdomen?
     

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