Male Ejaculation - Female Sexual Satisfaction & Function

Discussion in 'Men's Health Forum' started by Michael Scally MD, Oct 3, 2018.

  1. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

    Burri A, Buchmeier J, Porst H. The Importance of Male Ejaculation for Female Sexual Satisfaction and Function. J Sex Med 2018. https://www.jsm.jsexmed.org/article/S1743-6095(18)31158-5/abstract

    INTRODUCTION: Although links between ejaculatory control or intravaginal ejaculatory latency time and female sexual functioning have frequently been reported in the past, no study has investigated the importance of other male ejaculatory characteristics, such as ejaculation volume and intensity, for women's sexuality. AIM: To assess the importance of subjectively perceived ejaculation intensity and ejaculation volume for female sexual function and satisfaction.

    METHODS: This was a cross-sectional online survey including 240 sexually active, heterosexual women (median age 27.4 years), using study-specific questions and validated questionnaires.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Results are presented as means, percentages, and age-controlled partial correlation coefficients of the main study variables.

    RESULTS:

    · 50.43% of women considered it very important that the partner ejaculates during intercourse.

    · 18.3% of women preferred that the partner ejaculates before they reach orgasm, whereas for 53.5% this did not matter.

    · 22.6% of women stated that they experienced a more intense orgasm when their partner ejaculated during vaginal intercourse.

    · 17.4% reported that they definitely experienced a more intensive orgasm depending on the intensity of their partner's ejaculation, whereas for 17.8% this did not matter at all.

    · 20.9% of women did not feel that their orgasm was more intense depending on the subjectively felt ejaculate quantity, whereas the majority (37.9%) stated that it did not matter.

    · 13.1% of women regarded the quantity of expelled ejaculate as an expression of their own sexual attractiveness.

    Women stating that they experienced more intense orgasms when the partner ejaculated, when the partner experienced a more intense ejaculation, and when he expelled a greater ejaculate quantity also reported better lifelong orgasmic function (r = 0.24, r = 0.15, r = .26, respectively) and more lifelong sexual satisfaction (r = .29, r = .15, r = 26, respectively).

    CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: The perception of ejaculatory characteristics can be related to the female partner's sexual satisfaction and overall sexual functioning.

    STRENGTH & LIMITATIONS: This is the very first study to explore the importance of male ejaculation volume and intensity for women's sexual functioning. Data are of self-report nature and ejaculation characteristics were not objectively measured but by women's self-report.

    CONCLUSION: Although male ejaculation and its different aspects seem to play an important role for women, the study demonstrates a considerable variability of women's attitudes toward ejaculatory characteristics. Further research is required to examine the sources of this variability.
     
  2. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

    [More Science] Are Women’s Orgasms Hindered by Phallocentric Imperatives?

    Women who have sex with women (WSW) are more likely to report experiencing an orgasm during partnered sex, compared to women who have sex with men (WSM). We investigated whether this difference can be partially accounted for by phallocentric imperatives—gendered sexual scripts that prioritize men’s sexual experience.

    For example, these imperatives emphasize vaginal-penile intercourse (i.e., the coital imperative) and men’s physical pleasure (i.e., the male orgasm imperative). We reasoned that a larger variety of sexual behaviors indicates less adherence to the coital imperative and that more self-oriented orgasm goals for women indicate less adherence to the male orgasm imperative.


    Consistent with previous work, we expected WSW to report higher rates of orgasm than WSM when taking frequency of sex into account. We also hypothesized that this difference in orgasm rates would dissipate when controlling for variety of sexual behavior and women’s self-oriented orgasm goals.

    In a sample of 1988 WSM and 308 WSW, we found that WSW were 1.33 times (p < .001) more likely to report experiencing an orgasm than WSM, controlling for frequency of sex. This incidence rate ratio was reduced to 1.16 (p < .001) after taking into account variety of sexual behavior and self-oriented orgasm goals.

    Our findings indicate that certain sexual scripts (e.g., phallocentric imperatives) help explain the orgasm discrepancy between WSW and WSM. We discuss masturbation as another male-centered practice that may be relevant to this gap, as well as implications for intervention and future research.

    Willis M, Jozkowski KN, Lo W-J, Sanders SA. Are Women’s Orgasms Hindered by Phallocentric Imperatives? Archives of sexual behavior 2018;47:1565-76. Are Women’s Orgasms Hindered by Phallocentric Imperatives?