Protein Drinks: What's in them? The full report and List of Danger Drinks

Discussion in 'Men's Health Forum' started by m_ob, Jun 7, 2010.

  1. #1
    m_ob

    m_ob Active Member

    Here are the average amounts of metals we found in three servings of these protein drinks. The maximum limits for them in dietary supplements proposed by the U.S. Pharmacopeia are: arsenic (inorganic), 15 micrograms (µg) per day; cadmium, 5 µg; lead, 10 µg; mercury, 15 µg. Amounts at or exceeding those limits are in bold. Experts said three servings a day is common.
     

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  2. #2
    m_ob

    m_ob Active Member

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRgZuS_U9TQ&feature=player_embedded]YouTube - Protein Drink Dangers[/ame]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 4, 2014
  3. #3
    Millard Baker

    Millard Baker Member

    Looking at this chart alone, it is interesting how the data is manipulated for the sake of anti-protein propaganda.

    * Notice how "protein powders" are lumped in with "meal replacement drinks". If you look carefully, you will notice that ONLY the "meal replacement drinks" have high amounts of arsenic and lead. The "protein powders" are all low in these metals. Yet, they use this data to condemn "protein"!

    Why not condemn the carbohydrates and fats in the drinks instead? Given the relatively low metals in the true protein powders, they could have more logically concluded that the toxic metals accompanied the carb/fat-based ingredients!

    Interestingly, why didn't they compare 100 grams of one product with 100 grams of another product? Instead they compare 60 grams to 96 grams to 132 grams to 210 grams

    I welcome more lab testing to pressure supplement companies to improve their quality control. But clearly the authors had a pre-existing agenda that they worked hard to make the data support.

     
  4. #4
    Millard Baker

    Millard Baker Member

    Also, see Rick Collins' response to the Consumer Reports anti-protein piece!

    Are Protein Drinks “Dangerous”? | True Alpha Training

     
  5. #5
    m_ob

    m_ob Active Member

    I apprechiate you looking deeper into this. Obviously ,as you pointed out, after further more thorough evaluation you can tell something is biased here. I too would like to see more studies still, maybe by the protein companies this time. I do have one question on this though and that is how are these metals getting in there in the first place..? Cross-contamination or just a by-product?
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2010
  6. #6
    Millard Baker

    Millard Baker Member

    Also, interesting that the only three drinks to fail the Consumer Reports tests were all dietary supplements manufactured by a pharmaceutical company. You would expect a pharmaceutical company to have better quality control than its competitors in the sports nutrition area...
     

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