Question about Injections and Air Bubbles

Discussion in 'Men's Health Forum' started by Zek, Feb 26, 2006.

  1. #1
    Zek

    Zek Junior Member

    A little worried here. I just injected myself with 100mg of test cyp for my hrt program. I had a little air (about a quarter of a CC) at the top (toward the rubber part) and I injected myself and accidently injected the air. Do I have anything to worry about? I heard that could be deadly? Someone post to make me less paranoid.
     
  2. #2
    love_en

    love_en Junior Member

    You are OK as long as you did not put that air into a blood vessel. In fact, I have heard of an injection technique that calls for creating an air bubble to keep an IM injection from leaking out of the needle hole in the skin.
     
  3. #3
    Zek

    Zek Junior Member

    Thanks.....well I heard the same thing....I was just making sure it was okay. As you all know...I'm a little paranoid.
     
  4. #4
    Ruper

    Ruper Junior Member

    I always (well my total of 4 IM injections so far) put in an air bubble. Plus I usually have a bit from the aspiration. I like it because you know you put the full Test volume into the muscle. Plus I like the sound it makes.

    I know many people don't put the air in. Any particular reasons for not doing this way?
     
  5. #5
    1cc

    1cc Junior Member

    Do you have any links to more info about this?
     
  6. #6
    ASaxon

    ASaxon Junior Member

    From what Ive read you do not want to inject an air bubble at all since the consequences can be deadly if you make a mistake. Obviously, the concern is that an air bubble in the blood stream can cause an embolism and cause a blockage in an artery somewhere in the body (i.e. heart, brain.) My understanding is that usually a small amount of air injected into a vein is of no real concern as the small bubbles are usually absorbed immediately by the blood. However, if enough air is injected into a blood stream it may not be easily absorbed and if it travels through a narrow blood vessel it can stop and block blood flow. Its a similar thing that happens when a SCUBA diver gets the bends.

    From what Ive read its not a problem if air is injected into muscle as it will not enter the blood stream without being absorbed but the problem is that how do you know when youre injecting that you wouldnt be so close to a vein that in between the time you aspirate and inject that you havent accidentally moved the needle a little bit and pushed or pulled it into a vein? It just isnt worth the risk from what I understand, even if it is a low risk. Most instructions Ive read on injections suggest removing air bubbles from the syringe.

    As far as getting the full dose drawn into the syringe into your body...you can always draw a little bit more into the syringe rather than using an air bubble. I think Id generally avoid air bubbles if possible.
     
  7. #7
    caos

    caos Junior Member

    Last edited: Feb 27, 2006
  8. #8
    ASaxon

    ASaxon Junior Member

    Interesting read. Seems both are effective when done correctly and without mistakes. I would imagine most of those injections were into the glute and thus there was likely very little chance of accidently hitting a vein. I still think that for self injectors that probably inject into the thigh I wouldn't risk bubbles in the syringe. Especially when there's no really good reason to do it.
     
  9. #9
    love_en

    love_en Junior Member

    Not to start a debate, but the only time an air bubble would worry me is if said bubble were injected into a vein. When poking myself in the thigh every week, I always aspirate before injecting. I do know how a needle passing through a blood vessel feels like.(creepy, almost like hitting a nerve. not to mention the bleeding). Having said this, I Z-track my injections. My testosterone is too precious to have some leak back out.
     
  10. #10
    Zek

    Zek Junior Member

    Z track? Explain this method.
     
  11. #11
    ASaxon

    ASaxon Junior Member

    With z-track you basically pull the skin tight to one side of the injection site. Insert the needle, asperate, inject, remove needle and release skin. The needle track through the subcutaneous layer is then offset frm the muscle so that the medicine doesn't leak back out through the needle track.

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