Using TRT Through End Of Life?

Discussion in 'Men's Health Forum' started by jonkobeck, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. jonkobeck

    jonkobeck Member

    I am sure I am not the only one here who who has been on TRT for several years and then tried to stop and crashed. I stopped accidentally when I switched to a compounding gel a few years ago and not long after got very sick. I became extremely depressed, had absolutely zero energy, I tore muscles and was in chronic pain. It wasnt until I went in for some bloodwork to find out my T levels had crashed to almost nothing. I went right back on the injections and quickly recovered.
    I think of that time often, and it gives me great concern. What would happen if for some reason I had to stop TRT? It CAN happen to any of us. A heart attack, cancer, some disease that prohibits testosterone replacement. If you are hospitalized for whatever reason the hospital will not give you T simply because its prescribed to you. They WILL give you your Statins and blood pressure meds, but not T. Mainstream medicine hasn't accepted T replacement as a true medicinal. Or what about when we grow old? Know any 90 year olds on T?

    My point is, chances are there will come a time in our lives when we will have to stop TRT. I dread that day.
     
  2. FiEnD

    FiEnD Member

    I don't appreciate your negativity
     
  3. jonkobeck

    jonkobeck Member

    Just being real
     
    DrDylan, Burrr, FiEnD and 1 other person like this.
  4. bluepush

    bluepush Junior Member

    Hospitalized this year and the hospital, the nurse specifically, had wished I was due an injection because they would've essentially charged me for the entire vial, and would've therefore been obligated to provide it to me - his words not mine. Several other nurses emphasized the importance of maintaining my meds, but of course, none of my ailments were TRT inhibiting.

    You pose a great question though, and I look forward to hearing other responses.
     
    jonkobeck likes this.
  5. FiEnD

    FiEnD Member

    On a more serious note, I would imagine I would drop the testosterone and pick up a different compound. Not ideal for cycling but would benefit quality of life right? Just like muscle wasting from Aids...

    Would be desperate times for sure
     
  6. jonkobeck

    jonkobeck Member

    Interesting. I suppose if your in for a broken leg and can prove your on T then perhaps they would. But anything heart related, cancer etc, I don't know. Most doctors would recommend discontinuing. If your getting your T from a urologist, he is not going to follow up at the hospital, the attending hospital doctor would certainly discontinue it and advise you to follow up with your urologist after discharge...........I have a feeling that at some point in our lives, providing we live long enough, TRT will be contraindicated.
     
    bluepush likes this.
  7. bluepush

    bluepush Junior Member

    I don't disagree, contraindication is likely at some point, but let's just hope I'm old and opioids aren't illegal!

    Kidding aside, there was a period where my diagnosis was "possibly cardiac" but ultimately it was GI. When it came to my medical history there were no questions or second guessing, but I was able to provide valid prescriptions and dosages in writing along with my clinic's name. Scripts and dosages weren't requested (only used as reference when providing my history), but I DID involve my clinic in my treatment plan during my hospital visit. Just fyi.
     
    jonkobeck likes this.
  8. FiEnD

    FiEnD Member

    In all reality, if I'm dying I probably won't give two fucks about TRT or testosterone in general
     
  9. kendallkmw

    kendallkmw Member

    Just saying if I was in the hospital I'd definitely be having someone bring me my supplies from the house. Don't give a damn about what they're talking about.
     
    SteakWellDonePls and Harmswhey like this.
  10. Rockclimber

    Rockclimber Member

    My mother is an endocrinologist and has several patients in their 90s on testosterone replacement therapy. I asked her about this a while ago and she said that she has them on textbook replacement doses, not supraphysiological levels which at their age is around 200 to 300 nanograms a deciliter. My father is in his late 60s and she has him on 400 to 500 nanograms a deciliter. I'm sure you could find another hormone replacement dr willing to go higher than that but my mother is extremely conservative and goes with the book on all things. So I guess to answer your question yes, I know of several people in their 90s still on testosterone replacement therapy.
     
  11. jonkobeck

    jonkobeck Member

    Well, that gives us some hope at least. I work in a hospital and when I mention TRT they look at me like I'm crazy.
     
  12. roastdawg

    roastdawg Member

    Yeah this was one of my biggest struggles with staying on trt. Only 41 yrs old so that's a lot of years needing constant access to test to maintain quality of life. But being off sucks and no one knows what the future holds so I went for what works for the moment.
     
    strongsafety41 and jonkobeck like this.
  13. jonkobeck

    jonkobeck Member

    53 here dude.
     
    NorthMich and roastdawg like this.
  14. roastdawg

    roastdawg Member

    Are you on hcg along with your trt? I ask because I try to convince myself I'll be able to restart if I have to due to constant hcg usage.
     
  15. jonkobeck

    jonkobeck Member

    No only TRT. My doc doesn't believe in HCG. My total T was in the high 200s before getting on TRT so I don't know what I would be able to restart to anyway. Besides, if some severe medial issue prevents us from being on TRT then chances are we won't have access to HCG.
     
    roastdawg likes this.
  16. i dunno. i tend to think, if you're in your last days and you know it, TRT and Test levels would be the least of your worries.

    Chances are you'd already be feeling like a pile of shit left out in the sun and a quick shot of Test isn't going to vastly improve the already dire condition.
     
    SteakWellDonePls and FiEnD like this.
  17. bigdeadweight

    bigdeadweight Member

    This is what makes me wonder about all the young guys now going on the blast and cruise forever train in their 20's. Think about it, you are saying you will now have to do this forever or have a massive crash. Anyway, to your question, been on TRT for over 20 years, and it is a life saver for me. 40 now and I do wonder about how things will go in the future. I move abroad, NHS withdraws support for TRT etc etc. For now I am not worrying too much, but if I had to I would get wife/friend/family member to get test for me if I was hospitalised and they refused. But with Nebido I only need 1 shot every 3 months, so should be managable. Great question though.
     
    bluepush and jonkobeck like this.
  18. jonkobeck

    jonkobeck Member

    Well, Im not talking about being on your death-bed. Im thinking about when we get up in our 60s or even 50s for some, and the common ailments that affect so many start to happen. Heart disease is a common issue, and a big problem as far as TRT is concerned. LOTS of men in the 60s have heart issues of some kind. Are you a smoker? COPD is an issue that may cause a problem as it effects RBC and HCT levels and so does T. Maybe you develop diabetes and end up loosing a few toes or a foot. Oh and I almost forgot, Prostate cancer. Good luck being prescribed testosterone with Prostate cancer. In fact they will give you anti-cancer drugs to purposely lower T and raise E. Its a very long list, and the truth is that very few men advance into the 6th or 7th decade without some medical issues. Yes we are living now longer then ever, but in reality we are just living with diseases longer, and the longer we live the more health issues we will be living with.
     
    Sparkyp, thrombus and MisterSuperGod like this.
  19. Hendred

    Hendred Member

    I was under the impression the NHS were relatively clueless overall with TRT. Not being taught about it much less prescribing it. Glad to hear I'm wrong in your case.
     
  20. bigdeadweight

    bigdeadweight Member

    My GP wasn't great, but as I could talk to him with a certain level of knowledge myself I could explain why I thought I needed my case escalated. I then got referred to a good endo who was very good, and had experience with sports people who use steroids, so he was very helpful. It still took a long time from start to finish, and even now I would like to reduce the timing from 12 weeks to 10 weeks, but it isnt easy, so I will probably pay myself to get a series of bloods done and I can then take the evidence to my GP.
     
    Hendred likes this.