Why must doctors call in prescriptions for AAS but not controlled drugs like Adderall

Discussion in 'Steroid Forum' started by Millard Baker, Oct 17, 2008.

  1. #1
    Millard Baker

    Millard Baker Member

    Why must doctors call in prescriptions for AAS but not controlled drugs like amphetamines?

    Do they perceive the risk of abuse or diversion so much greater when it comes to anabolic steroids as compared to Adderall?
     
  2. #2
    SmugLife

    SmugLife Junior Member

    Re: Why must doctors call in prescriptions for AAS but not controlled drugs like Adde


    Doc.s in my state can't call in schedule 2, including adderall/methylphenidate etc...
     
  3. #3
    BBC3

    BBC3 Well-Known Member

    Re: Why must doctors call in prescriptions for AAS but not controlled drugs like Adde

    Adderall is a sched 1. No doc can call that in. No doc can write more than a month at a time. Some will even card you to pick up at docs office.

    Testerone is Shedule 3. Any doc can call that in anywhere, any state most likely. It is much easier to prescribe....:)
     
  4. #4
    Millard Baker

    Millard Baker Member

    Re: Why must doctors call in prescriptions for AAS but not controlled drugs like Adde

    I was under the impression that drugs at greater risk for "diversion and abuse" would ONLY be called in by a doctor. It seemed like this would make it more difficult for someone to obtain the drug illegitimately.

    OTOH, it seemed that drug with lower abuse potential (or diversion risk) could be written on a doctor's prescription pad for the patient to take to any pharmacy.

    IOW (according to this reasoning)...

    Schedule 2 Adderall would be CALLED IN.

    But Schedule 3 testosterone would be a WRITTEN PRESCRIPTION
     
  5. #5
    HeadDoc

    HeadDoc Psychologist; Super Moderator

    Re: Why must doctors call in prescriptions for AAS but not controlled drugs like Adde

    actually the control of scripts for stimulants is so tight that a doc must write a script each month. Most docs can write a script for testosterone with renewals. So the tighter the scrutiny, the more frequently the doc has to write a script. This implies that the doc is forced to review the need monthly.
     
  6. #6
    Millard Baker

    Millard Baker Member

    Re: Why must doctors call in prescriptions for AAS but not controlled drugs like Adde

    In Texas, I think it is 3 months for stimulants but same for testosterone... But what are the controls for doctors calling into pharmacy versus writing a physical script?
     
  7. #7
    HeadDoc

    HeadDoc Psychologist; Super Moderator

    Re: Why must doctors call in prescriptions for AAS but not controlled drugs like Adde

    the pharmacy has a signature and the state has a record. People who abuse painkillers and get scripts from several docs can get caught this way. Here in AZ, my doc gives me enough renewals for TRT to keep me going for months on one script----I never figured it out but it probably comes to a year at the doses he prescribes.
     
  8. #8
    xxjaredxx

    xxjaredxx Junior Member

    Re: Why must doctors call in prescriptions for AAS but not controlled drugs like Adde


    Adderall is a schedule II....Schedule I's are drugs that are of little/no medicinal value. Amphetimines and other various C-II's must have a physically written & signed script every month...no more than a 30 day supply can be called for at a time. C-III's can't be called in persay; however, more than a month's supply can be issued at one time.
     
  9. #9
    BBC3

    BBC3 Well-Known Member

    Re: Why must doctors call in prescriptions for AAS but not controlled drugs like Adde

    You guys stand me corrected again!! Regarding the call-in versus the written script. I always thought it was simply because of the nature of the class of drug. Meaning, I thought shedule II's were either more powerful or, commonly sought after. Thus, the reason for the written script is the CYA factor. Anyone could fake a doc's voice on a phone and call in a script verbrally relaying the docs DEA number.. Whereas on the more controlled ones, there would be written documentation covering everyone. This protects the pharmacy, the doc, and you. There can be no questions short of forgery which is more traceable.

    If i am correct about the likelihood of abuse being a factor in the shedule two class, past (and even current) demand in society is tiny in comparison on black market to narcotics, per say. If strength or danger has anything to do with the classification, I think the FDA states testosterone is diffiult to impossible to fataly overdose on. Although, i would not want to be on the receiving end of a 5 gram pin!!!:eek: When you consider that you can overdose and die from too much nyquil, I think the second of my theories is probably incorrect.

    Thanks for the correction. Nobody's perfect:D:D
     
  10. #10
    Millard Baker

    Millard Baker Member

    Re: Why must doctors call in prescriptions for AAS but not controlled drugs like Adde

    Thank you for all the clarifications - you've answered my questions.
     
  11. #11
    xxjaredxx

    xxjaredxx Junior Member

    Re: Why must doctors call in prescriptions for AAS but not controlled drugs like Adde

    Glad I could help guys:) on another note - not really being the point of discussion, but classes are scheduled according to their abuse potential, Class II - Class V (Class I = illicit/non-medicinal substances). Incase anybody cares:D
     
  12. #12
    xxjaredxx

    xxjaredxx Junior Member

    Re: Why must doctors call in prescriptions for AAS but not controlled drugs like Adde


    If you can overdose on water:eek:- I'm pretty sure overdosing on testosterone would not be completely out of the ball park.
     

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