aversion to bitcoin

My impression of bitcoin is that it is complicated to trace the money. So it will draw more attention from the Government than if you were to use larger financial institutions. The smartest computer techs in the world work for the government. They will be more interested in bitcoin than someone who uses WU. Why? Terrorists, also human nature. The harder someone tries to hide something the more interested people become. They want to know why. They don't really care what. If your father hides a gun in the house, you get curious and want to look for it. If your father tells you the gun is in the closet and not to touch it, you probably wont. (bad example) but.. if its harder to find, lager smarter people will get involved. The amount of attacks nations are having and people trying to support extremist groups, trying to travel to other countries, nations are on high alert. I see AAS as less important and not a priority. Like you said, if they want to find you they will, but I feel like they are more insulted the trickier you get because they feel like someone is saying "Im smarter than you" and they need to prove you wrong. Just my thoughts, but I need to read up more on bitcoin.
I don't really agree with that logic.

The government will be more interested in someone using a VPN over plain ISP connection.

Same argument with PGP/GPG encrypted mail over non-encrypted mail.

TOR browsing versus normal browsing.

Darknet over clearnet.

Protonmail/countermail over gmail/yahoo.

Pseudonyms over real names.

And Bitcoin over WU/MG.

So, is the answer to use a gmail account, avoid PGP/GPG, stay "clear" of darknet, never use a VPN, avoid TOR at all costs, always use your real name and finally choose WU over Bitcoin?
 

D-Ballin

Member
I'll still use the one that's harder to trace. The government geeks are watching whether it's easy or not, so might as well make the fuckers work.

Abuse of wu/mg is going to keep contributing to busts. And either way you go about it you're fucked. At least I'm not facing potential wire fraud or money laundering charges with btc.

Cash transfers and legit bank transfers have been funding terrorism a lot longer than bitcoin too. . .
 

D-Ballin

Member
I don't really agree with that logic.

The government will be more interested in someone using a VPN over plain ISP connection.

Same argument with PGP/GPG encrypted mail over non-encrypted mail.

TOR browsing versus normal browsing.

Darknet over clearnet.

Protonmail/countermail over gmail/yahoo.

Pseudonyms over real names.

And Bitcoin over WU/MG.

So, is the answer to use a gmail account, avoid PGP/GPG, stay "clear" of darknet, never use a VPN, avoid TOR at all costs, never go on darknet, always use your real name and finally choose WU over Bitcoin?
You could stand on a downtown corner with a sign that reads "I need illicit drugs".

It's so stupid that you've got to be invisible.
 
Here's some info about Western Union that you guys might find interesting. It's from a never-before-published partial transcript from an interview I had in 2008 with a guy busted in Operation Raw Deal...

"When they sat me down in the meeting for the first time they laid out in front of me all the evidence they had against me. They had pictures, they had videos, they had you know, you had gone here this time and you had gone here that time, you were seen with this person, you were seen with that person, you wired hundreds of thousands of dollars overseas to China and you have been importing raw powder from China. I mean they present this information right in front of you and then say, “now what do you want to do?”

Q: They know the details better than you!

A: I mean, they were telling me “ok you sent this much money” and I said “there’s no way I sent that much money to China.” And they pulled out a Western Union report that was turned over to them from Western Union. They where like - I can’t remember exactly off the top of my head right now, but it was like $457,800 and something and 27 cents. And I was like “oh ok.” I mean Western Union actually flagged my name as a possible person involved in illegal activities and turned it over to the DEA.

Q: Was it initiated by Western Union?

A: According to them it started with Western Union and that’s where they got a list of names of people who are sending a lot of money overseas. I guess its part of Homeland Security Act where they are watching large money transfers. But then what they started noticing is that there was a common trend like – Wong Duck Fo in China was not only receiving $5,000 every two weeks from me, but he was also receiving $5,000 from xxxx xxxx, he was receiving $5,000 from John Doe and Jane Doe and this person and that person. So they are thinking “why is this guy getting $200,000 to 300,000 dollars a week about of all these different people across the United States?”

Q: They probably can easily rule it out as terrorism-related, so they figure it is related to controlled substances, maybe steroids?

A: Right, so they start reverse engineering the investigation and they find out a common thread behind the people who are sending money out. They get “xxxx xxxx” you get a bunch of information check, he is a big guy. And you get “xxxx xxxx” you check it out he is really a big guy. And you find out wow these guys are all bodybuilders. Then they think this might possibly have something to do with anabolic steroids. And so they turn it over to the FDA and the FDA starts doing their thing and they start reverse engineering downward getting more to the state and local level. And then they end up finding people, ‘oh yeah, I heard rumors about this guy and that guy being involved in this and that.” And basically, they just get one step closer, one step closer and then they’ve got you. It’s not really rocket science. I tell you what, they have all the resources in the world at their disposal and your name pops up for one reason or another and you’re involved in illegal stuff, they will stack a bunch of information against you. And when they come to you, their case is already gone and in front of a grand jury and they have enough information and they go to trial and convict.
 

ecdysone

Junior Member
Try buying some bitcoin someday and find out how it's like getting f**ked!
Typically you have to find some sleazeball dealer in East Europe to get a relatively "non-ripoff" rate then pay with WU or MG. If you can approach 80% of the fair market value for the crap currently, you will be doing good.

What a totally disgusting system, run by mafia types world-wide.
 

D-Ballin

Member
Try buying some bitcoin someday and find out how it's like getting f**ked!
Typically you have to find some sleazeball dealer in East Europe to get a relatively "non-ripoff" rate then pay with WU or MG. If you can approach 80% of the fair market value for the crap currently, you will be doing good.

What a totally disgusting system, run by mafia types world-wide.
Jesus, where is that?

If it's America, you're way behind the times. Elsewhere, I guess you're just behind. . .
 
Try buying some bitcoin someday and find out how it's like getting f**ked!
Typically you have to find some sleazeball dealer in East Europe to get a relatively "non-ripoff" rate then pay with WU or MG. If you can approach 80% of the fair market value for the crap currently, you will be doing good.

What a totally disgusting system, run by mafia types world-wide.
This is not always the case in Eastern Europe. For example, bitcoin is particularly thriving in places like Czech Republic.

Also, Coinbase supports a few Eastern European countries e.g. Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia.

https://www.coinbase.com/global

In US, I think Coinbase charges 1%. It may be the same for other countries but I'm not sure.

In non-supported Eastern European countries, I know some people are paying brokers only 3% in other Eastern European countries. It's not as good as free for Circle or 1% for Coinbase but it's better than the scenario you described.
 

Burrr

Member
AnabolicLab.com Supporter
For us in the USA, is it safe to connect your bitcoin wallet to your bank account, or should we be funding our wallet through a WU transaction.... which would kind of defeat the purpose.
 

D-Ballin

Member
For us in the USA, is it safe to connect your bitcoin wallet to your bank account, or should we be funding our wallet through a WU transaction.... which would kind of defeat the purpose.
Never buy btc through wu. Almost always a scam. If you are in a major city, or have access to one, you have local bitcoiners for added anonymity.
 
Millard do you have top apps you like after you use coinbase? Like third party apps?
It depends on what is most important to you.

For privacy and anonymity, I'd choose one with a coinjoin implementation like blockchain.info or Dark Wallet. There may be others too. Mycelium is supposedly working to add coinjoin.

For security (storing large quantity of BTC), I would choose a hardware wallet like Trezor.

There are other factors that may be important to you e.g. ease of use, mobile app, etc.

I can't say that any one wallet has it all. There's often a trade off in features.
 
For us in the USA, is it safe to connect your bitcoin wallet to your bank account, or should we be funding our wallet through a WU transaction.... which would kind of defeat the purpose.
I don't think it's necessarily a problem linking your bank account to Coinbase. If you value privacy and don't want Coinbase or anyone else monitoring how you spend your money, then you need to take additional steps.

For maximum privacy, you need to break the connection between Coinbase and outgoing transactions. You could send it from Coinbase to a third-party wallet with a coinjoin implementation like blockchain.info that obscures the spending of outgoing transactions. Or you could send it from Coinbase to a cleaning service like Helix light and have resulting bitcoin sent to another wallet controlled by you (even better if it's a wallet w/ coinjoin).
 

haas480

Member
In the recent past, I've run across more individuals accepting this "bitcoin". I've only done some light reading on their website and through a few threads, but is anyone able to give a brief overview of how to get started with bitcoin and any pointers to make things easier? This would be for an average Joe, who makes minimal transactions of only a few hundred dollars per say.

Once you "Get Started", they're nice enough to remind you to read up and learn how the system works.

Then you select a wallet, this is where I'd like some pointers and explanation. Mobile vs Desktop vs Web, any difference in features or security. Why one or the other, or doesn't matter? Most user friendly?

Then it looks like just a matter of adding funds (sounds like bank account isnt a bad idea to add funds to your wallet), and sending them.

Sending them is the next place where some info could be helpful. Millard mentioned a 3rd party to break up the transaction. But how does that work? Do you create a wallet with blockchain, send money from your coinbase wallet to your blockchain wallet, then log in to your blockchain wallet and send money to the desired person (since this blockchain wallet doesn't have your bank account tied to it)?

just curious. looking to try this out since we've been waiting for such a convenient process for yearssssss.

thanks.
 

Isaac

Member
In the recent past, I've run across more individuals accepting this "bitcoin". I've only done some light reading on their website and through a few threads, but is anyone able to give a brief overview of how to get started with bitcoin and any pointers to make things easier? This would be for an average Joe, who makes minimal transactions of only a few hundred dollars per say.

Once you "Get Started", they're nice enough to remind you to read up and learn how the system works.

Then you select a wallet, this is where I'd like some pointers and explanation. Mobile vs Desktop vs Web, any difference in features or security. Why one or the other, or doesn't matter? Most user friendly?

Then it looks like just a matter of adding funds (sounds like bank account isnt a bad idea to add funds to your wallet), and sending them.

Sending them is the next place where some info could be helpful. Millard mentioned a 3rd party to break up the transaction. But how does that work? Do you create a wallet with blockchain, send money from your coinbase wallet to your blockchain wallet, then log in to your blockchain wallet and send money to the desired person (since this blockchain wallet doesn't have your bank account tied to it)?

just curious. looking to try this out since we've been waiting for such a convenient process for yearssssss.

thanks.
Look into an app called 'Circle', i think they are the simplest but they charge like $5 per transaction. www.circle.com

@pumpingiron22 's guide
This Is How PI does Bitcoin | MESO-Rx Forum
He also uses and explains the extra wallets.


PI's service for the lazy
P.I. Bitcoin and Tech Services | MESO-Rx Forum
 

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