Acne

Discussion in 'Steroid Forum' started by Todd1234, Oct 11, 2011.

  1. Casca

    Casca Member

    You’d do well to run yourself a course of Accutane, obviously bloods every month as are required. Nuetralizing the over developement of sebum from the sebaceous glands. Stay out of the sun during treatment and get something for your dry nose and lips.
     
  2. Tiny Mighty Joe

    Tiny Mighty Joe Junior Member

    I am going through a course of Accutane, 40mg a day.Its been almost 4 months now, and ti has clam downed most of my acne. Mostly cystic acne. It was pretty bad. I'm 66 years old, and never had acne in my life. I am on low dose trt. The only complaint I have is the dry lips. No other side affects. I get my blood work done every month,and all show good, considering I take other meds for other health issues. I know this medication is harsh, but its different for everyone. I would consider taking it, but blood work is imperative... Good luck.
     
  3. It's best not to run a cycle and use Accutane at the same time, as the amount of pressure and harsh conditions it puts on your liver. If you're having acne issues during cycle then clears up after pct. I would recommend you run 6-8 months of 20-40mg per day and allow 60 days before you run another AAS cycle. As for doxycycline, I've used it and have great results. But it's not a long term treatment like Acctane and will wreck your immune system if taken more than 30+ days
     
  4. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

    Androgens, Androgen Receptors, and the Skin: From the Laboratory to the Clinic With Emphasis on Clinical and Therapeutic Implications

    The effects of androgens on human skin include growth and differentiation of sebaceous glands, terminal hair growth, epidermal barrier function, wound healing, and modification of the cutaneous microbiome. Androgens exert their activities via ligand formation with intracytoplasmic androgen receptors which can then translocate to the nucleus and interact with genetic androgen response elements to influence signaling cascades.

    Differences in tissue distribution and activities of enzymes that modify androgen synthesis and catabolism, variations related to gender and ethnicity/race, and genetic polymorphisms that affect androgen receptor functionality directly impact androgen physiology and the pathophysiology associated with a variety of disease states.

    This manuscript reviews the fundamentals of androgen physiology, androgen synthesis and catabolism in local skin tissue, androgen receptor activity, as well as the impact of genetic polymorphisms and gender. Emphasis is placed on the roles of androgenic activity in sebaceous gland development, sebum production, and the pathophysiology of acne vulgaris.

    Del Rosso JQ, Kircik LH, Stein Gold L, Thiboutot D. Androgens, Androgen Receptors, and the Skin: From the Laboratory to the Clinic With Emphasis on Clinical and Therapeutic Implications. J Drugs Dermatol. 2020;19(3):30-35. Androgens, Androgen Receptors, and the Skin: From the Laboratory to the Clinic With Emphasis on Clinical and Therapeutic Implications
     
  5. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

    Game Changer in Acne Treatment

    Of the four primary pathogenic factors that drive acne vulgaris—
    1. androgen excess,
    2. increased sebum production,
    3. faulty keratinization, and
    4. overgrowth of C. acnes—

    androgen excess has been the most elusive therapeutic target.

    Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) have direct effect on circulating hormones, but their potential use is limited to a subset of women. As such, a sizable portion of the population affected by acne vulgaris cannot even consider treatment with OCPs.

    While these systemic agents are generally associated with a low risk profile and have a history of safe and effective use, they are not entirely risk-free. Indirect androgen modulation through the use of spironolactone has become increasingly popular

    Kircik LH. Game Changer in Acne Treatment. J Drugs Dermatol. 2020;19(3):28. Game Changer in Acne Treatment
     
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  6. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

     
  7. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

     
  8. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

     
  9. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

     
  10. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

    [OA] Acne Related to Dietary Supplements

    Multiple prescription medications may cause or aggravate acne. A number of dietary supplements have also been linked to acne, including those containing vitamins B6/B12, iodine, and whey, as well as "muscle building supplements" that may be contaminated with anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). Acne linked to dietary supplements generally resolves following supplement discontinuation.

    Lesions associated with high-dose vitamin B6 and B12 supplements have been described as monomorphic and although pathogenesis is unknown, a number of hypotheses have been proposed. Iodine-related acne may be related to the use of kelp supplements and has been reported as monomorphic, inflammatory pustules on the face and upper trunk.

    Whey protein supplements, derived from milk and used for bodybuilding, are associated with papulonodular acne involving the trunk and sometimes the face. Finally, AAS-induced acne has been described as acne fulminans, acne conglobata, and acne papulopustulosa.

    With studies indicating that about half of US adults report using dietary supplements, it is important that dermatologists directly ask acne patients about their supplement use and educate them on the potential risks of even seemingly innocuous dietary supplements.

    Zamil DH, Perez-Sanchez A, Katta R. Acne related to dietary supplements. Dermatol Online J. 2020;26(8):13030/qt9rp7t2p2. Published 2020 Aug 15. Acne related to dietary supplements
     
    Davidinovg likes this.