Dogs

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Michael Scally MD, May 5, 2011.

  1. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

     
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  2. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

    We have had our Zoe now for ~1,5 years. She looks great and is wonderful. Like this dog, she had heart worm and was 20 pounds underweight with other health issues. Now, picture of health and a joy. We adopted another dog six months ago - Emma. She is doing well. If we could, we would adopt many more.

     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2018
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  3. Seven

    Seven Member AnabolicLab.com Supporter

    On Oct 24th I lost my girl, Cally. Her liver was bad and it was causing her to lose weight, diarrhea, vomiting, etc. She was so sick. I miss her so much. We walked ED for the last 5yrs. She helped me get back into shape. She was a month away from 15.

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    Cally would always greet me when I would come home. Jazz, my cat who is 16yrs old, now does. She never did before. It's like she knows I'm hurting.

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  4. BigNattyDaddy

    BigNattyDaddy Member

    Sorry for your loss @Seven Dog. :( Losing a pet is always hard, but it sounds like she lived a long life. I have read that pets can pick up on our emotions. Cally is not suffering anymore and is in the big, gold dog park in the sky now.
     
  5. valuum

    valuum Member

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    Met with the sugar momma today :) divorce money ftw
     
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  6. rawdeal

    rawdeal Junior Member

    There is a poem on the Net called The Rainbow Bridge, it's sorta childlike, but it's comforting. Describes a dog crossing The Bridge when it dies and reaching the doggie version of heaven. There it meets and plays with all the other dogs who have gone before. Those who were sick or injured are all good as new. But one day your dog gets a gleam in its eye and returns to the Bridge.

    And then, YOU come, and cross the Bridge.
     
  7. Seven

    Seven Member AnabolicLab.com Supporter

    This video is killing me.




    It plays constantly at Planet Fitness. Yep I go to a PF lol.
     
  8. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

    I love my pets. And, I miss those that have passed.
     
  9. rawdeal

    rawdeal Junior Member

    I didn't need to see that! Fwiw, Brian Shaw, the 6'8" 450lb former WSM, has a vid on Youtube where he and 2 friends go to PF to see how fast they can get get thrown out. They never are, Mission Un-accomplished.
     
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  10. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

     
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  11. BigNattyDaddy

    BigNattyDaddy Member

    Okay, who's chopping onions?
     
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  12. rawdeal

    rawdeal Junior Member

    4 of my original 9 are gone now. I did that onion thing each time. Thought about each every damn day for a while. A little less now, but still "frequent."
     
  13. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

     
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  14. rawdeal

    rawdeal Junior Member

    Dammit, a little bit of that onion thing again ....... I do happy onions as well as the traditional kind for dogs.
     
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  15. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

     
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  16. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

     
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  17. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine



    When the dog genome was sequenced in 2005, scientists thought they would quickly be able to pin down the genes that give every breed its hallmark personality. But they found so much variation even within a breed that they could never study enough dogs to get meaningful results.

    So in the new study, Evan MacLean, a comparative psychologist at the University of Arizona in Tucson, and colleagues began by looking at behavioral data for about 14,000 dogs from 101 breeds. The analyses come from the Canine Behavioral Assessment & Research Questionnaire (C-BARQ), a sort of pet personality quiz developed by James Serpell, an ethologist at the University of Pennsylvania. C-BARQ asks questions like, “What does your dog do when a stranger comes to the door?” to allow owners to objectively characterize 14 aspects of their pet’s personalities, including trainability, attachment, and aggression. Since the survey was developed in 2003, more than 50,000 owners have participated.

    The team matched up these behavioral data for each breed with genetic data about breeds from different sets of dogs. They didn’t look at genetic and behavioral data for individual dogs, but rather averages across a specific breed. In all, the team identified 131 places in a dog’s DNA that may help shape 14 key personality traits.

    Together, these DNA regions explain about 15% of a dog breed’s personality, with each exerting only a small effect. Trainability, chasing, and a tendency to be aggressive toward strangers were the most highly heritable traits, the scientists report in a paper posted this month on the preprint server bioRxiv.
     
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  18. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

     
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  19. ickyrica

    ickyrica Member AnabolicLab.com Supporter

    That shit will make a swole man cry, doc.
     
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  20. Michael Scally MD

    Michael Scally MD Doctor of Medicine

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